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Showing posts from 2021

Pharo 9: A giant leap - Wednesday, April 28th

The next meeting of the UK Smalltalk User Group will be on Wednesday, April 28th. Esteban Lorenzano will give us an update on Pharo : What's new? What is updated? What remains? This talk will present (and show working!) the Pharo 9 roadmap and principal changes made to Pharo since the release of the previous version. Esteban studied Computer Sciences at Universidad de Buenos Aires, and worked since 1994 in many object-oriented and low-level technologies in different software companies, serving in various positions from junior programmer to senior architect. In 2007 he co-founded Smallworks to offer Pharo-based agile development projects. Since 2012 he dedicated full time to developing the Pharo code and community. He works for the Pharo Consortium in Lille, France, as lead developer for Pharo and being responsible with the coordination of new releases and the implementation and maintenance of several Pharo libraries. Given the current COVID-19 restrictions, this will be an online

Vector Graphics in Cuis Smalltalk - Wednesday 31st March

The next meeting of the UK Smalltalk User Group will be on Wednesday, March 31st.   In this meeting, Juan Vuletich will present a Vector Graphic implementation in Cuis Smalltalk. Graphics for interactive software have traditionally been constrained for performance reasons. The consequence is that most software has serious trouble adapting to higher resolution screens, requires platform specific widget kits, provides limited functionality, and has sub optimal visual quality. But improvements in computing power over the last couple of decades enable a brighter future: Cuis Smalltalk provides a VectorGraphics based implementation of the Morphic UI framework that addresses all these issues. Juan Vuletich is a long standing member of the Open Source Smalltalk community. He started Cuis Smalltalk 12 years ago and has led it ever since. He has been contributing kernel code to Squeak and the Squeak VM for over 20 years. He holds an Ms.Sc. in Computer Science from the University of Buenos Air

Amber with Silk - Wednesday, February 24th

 The next meeting of the UK Smalltalk User Group will be on Wednesday, February 24th.   Christian Haider will guide us in a tour of the Amber dialect of Smalltalk and its Silk web framework. In his own words... Amber , created by Nicolas Petton, is a Smalltalk implemented in JavaScript running in a web browser. Silk , written by the Amber maintainer Herby Vojčík, is a web framework in Amber.    I was looking for a good solution for the web for a long time. At the last ESUG, I was bugging everybody about a Smalltalk in the browser, because I decided to redo the frontend of my current project in Smalltalk instead of JavaScript. There were some developments, but only Amber was available. So I tried it for real on a little side project ( sources ) to see if this route is viable - spoiler: it is!   Silk, the web framework, caught my attention and I fell in love with it. Silk is very simple, straight forward and powerful, just the properties I love Smalltalk for. A Silk is basically a faca

A Bare-Metal Smalltalk-80 System for the Raspberry Pi - Wednesday, January 27th

The next meeting of the UK Smalltalk User Group will be on Wednesday, January 27th. For this presentation, guest speaker Michael Engel will bring us back to basics with a bare-metal Smalltalk-80 system for the Raspberry Pi. In 2020, the Xerox PARC research laboratory celebrated its 50th anniversary. One of the most important developments coming out of PARC is the Smalltalk system, which integrates a programming language, operating system and graphical user interface. Today, most of the Smalltalk systems run in hosted mode on a conventional operating system. This contradicts Dan Ingalls' idea that "an operating system is a collection of things that don't fit inside a language; there shouldn't be one". Accordingly, original Smalltalk systems, e.g. for the Alto workstation, ran on the bare metal of the computer. In this talk, we will discuss an approach to create a bare-metal Smalltalk-80 implementation for the Raspberry Pi , a popular family of ARM-based systems. In