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Packing up camp

Camp Smalltalk London was a great success!

We had nearly 40 people attending from all over the UK, Europe, and even the United States. Attendees shared information, made new connections, learned Smalltalk or Seaside, and made real progress on their projects. I'd like to thank Cincom for sponsoring the Saturday evening "ice bar" social, Pinesoft for providing the venue, Instantiations and ESUG for keeping us fed and hydrated during the day, and Sourcesense for providing the conference badges. Also, I'd like to thank and congratulate everyone who put their efforts into organizing the event. Certainly their participating made this a much more enjoyable event.

We're already working to finalize a date for Camp Smalltalk London 2011 about a year from now and are considering organizing some other similar events in the meantime. More details will be available soon. Those without prior Smalltalk experience had a great time in the tutorials and we plan to maintain this format to make sure that everyone is welcome at Camp Smalltalk. So if you missed this one, keep an eye out for upcoming announcements. And in the meantime, why not come by one of our monthly user group meetings? (the next one is next Monday, the 26th)

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