Skip to main content

Smalltalk and Self hardware - 29 June 2022

 For our June meeting, Merik Voswinkel will give us a presentation on Smalltalk and Self hardware with a focus on manycore parallelism and distributed computing.

This follows from Jecel Assumpcao Jr's SiliconSqueak presentation at the California Smalltalkers meetup.
Merik will bring us on a tour past 50 years of late bound message passing Smalltalk VMs, Smalltalk RISC processors, David Ungar’s RoarVM, adaptive compilers, concurrent aggregates, clone-reduce, a processor per object, FPGA’s, Morphle Logic, Croquet and Teatime , Wafer Scale Integration, hundred (M1 Ultra), thousands and million cores ASICs, Cuniform, Matroshca Brains and much more in our tourney towards the Wayne Gretzky invention game of inventing the future.
If there is time we’ll go burning the Smalltalk disk packs, the intergalactic network GUI and the destiny of computers as intellectual amplifiers for humans pervasively networked worldwide and how we are going to communicate with Aliens.

Merik Voswinkel is an independent scientist who build his first transputer supercomputer for Smalltalk after the Byte 1981 Smalltalk issue, build one of the first internet providers, works on SiliconSqueak, wafer scale integrations and Enernet energy computing.

 This will be an online meeting from home. If you'd like to join us, please sign up on the Meetup page.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The next UK Smalltalk User Group meeting is on this coming Monday, 30th January at 6.30pm at it’s usual location  The Counting House . This is the first of the talks that we selected at the Christmas meeting. And for some reason I got chosen to go first: Anatomy of an IDE Using a few example IDEs we are going to look at what makes an IDE valuable. Building software is a complex business, software that works and stays in production for years. It is a craft that involves engineering, insight and skill. The tools that we use to build that software are vital enablers to our success. Between 1997-2004 the dominance of Java and the main vendors’ tools strategies led to something of a stagnation for IDEs. But since then with the return to language diversity and the broadening of platforms there has been a real opportunity to experiment with what an IDE is and means and to look at how it could evolve. We will look at a range of IDEs including WebVelocity, Cloud9 and Codea and cont

Kyma - an object oriented sound and music system - Wednesday, May 27th

The next meeting of the UK Smalltalk User Group will be on Wednesday, May 27th. Alan Jackson will talk to us about Kyma , an object- oriented sound design environment built with Smalltalk technology. Given the current COVID-19 restrictions, this will be an online meeting from home. If you'd like to join us, please sign up in advance on the meeting's  Meetup page  to receive the meeting details. Don’t forget to bring your laptop and drinks!

Amber with Silk - Wednesday, February 24th

 The next meeting of the UK Smalltalk User Group will be on Wednesday, February 24th.   Christian Haider will guide us in a tour of the Amber dialect of Smalltalk and its Silk web framework. In his own words... Amber , created by Nicolas Petton, is a Smalltalk implemented in JavaScript running in a web browser. Silk , written by the Amber maintainer Herby Vojčík, is a web framework in Amber.    I was looking for a good solution for the web for a long time. At the last ESUG, I was bugging everybody about a Smalltalk in the browser, because I decided to redo the frontend of my current project in Smalltalk instead of JavaScript. There were some developments, but only Amber was available. So I tried it for real on a little side project ( sources ) to see if this route is viable - spoiler: it is!   Silk, the web framework, caught my attention and I fell in love with it. Silk is very simple, straight forward and powerful, just the properties I love Smalltalk for. A Silk is basically a faca